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Immunohistochemical Localization of Anoctamin 1 in the Mouse Cerebellum
Applied Microscopy 2018;48:110-6
Published online December 28, 2018
© 2018 Korean Society of Microscopy.

Yong Soo Park1,2, Ji Hyun Jeon1, Seung Hee Lee1,2, Sun Sook Paik1,2, and In-Beom Kim1,2,3,*

1Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 06591, Korea, 2Catholic Neuroscience Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 06591, Korea, 3Catholic Institute for Applied Anatomy, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 06591, Korea
Correspondence to: *Correspondence to: Kim IB, http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1932-8407, Tel: +82-2-2258-7263, Fax: +82-2-536-3110, E-mail: ibkimmd@catholic.ac.kr
Received December 3, 2018; Revised December 19, 2018; Accepted December 19, 2018.
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract

Since a transmembrane protein, TMEM16A, also called anoctamin 1 (ANO1), was identified as a bona fide calcium (Ca2+)-activated chloride (Cl) channel (CaCC), there have been many reports on its expression and function. However, limited information on ANO1 expression and function in the brain is still available. In this study, we tried to reexamine expression patterns of ANO1 in the mouse cerebellum and further characterize ANO1-expressing components by immunohistochemical analyses. Strong ANO1 immunoreactivity was observed as large puncta in the granule cell layer and weak to moderate immunoreactivities were observed as small puncta in the molecular and Purkinje cell layers. Double-label experiments revealed that ANO1 did not colocalize with cerebellar neuronal population markers, such as anti-calbindin and anti-NeuN, while it colocalized or intermingled with a presynaptic marker, anti-synaptophysin. These results demonstrate that ANO1 is mainly localized at presynaptic terminals in the cerebellum and involved in synaptic transmission and modulation in cerebellar information processing.

Keywords : Anoctamin 1, Calcium-activated chloride channel, Immunohistochemistry, Cerebellum
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